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Undergraduate Study

Second Year Courses

Second Year Courses

BIO2010F   Principles of Ecology and Evolution

A compulsory weekend fieldtrip

24 NQF credits at HEQSF level 6

Convener: Associate Professor G A Verboom

Course entry requirements: BIO1000F or BIO1000H, BIO1004F/S, STA1007S or STA100F/S highly recommended.

Course outline:

This course explains how species have evolved and have adapted to the environments in which they live. Topics include an introduction to evolution; natural selection; inheritance and genetics; ecology at the community, population and individual levels; and animal and plant life histories and interactions. The formal lectures and practicals are supported by a two-day compulsory field camp.

Lecture times: Monday - Friday, 1st period

DP requirements: 50% for class record, submission of assignments on schedule, and attendance at a field camp held during the Easter vacation.

Assessment: A 3-hour examination, written in June, with a sub-minimum of 40% will count for 50% of the course. Coursework marks will be allocated as follows: Practical classes (assessed weekly) count 20%; project based on field camp data collection counts 10%; two class tests count 20%.

 

BIO2011S   Life on Land: Animals

24 NQF credits at HEQSF level 6

Convener: Dr G Bronner

Course entry requirements: BIO1000F or BIO1000H, BIO1004F/S.

Course outline:

This course familiarises students with the evolution, functional biology and physiology of invertebrates and vertebrate animals living in terrestrial environments. It covers the diversity and life styles of land animals (particularly myriapods, arachnids, insects and tetrapod vertebrates), and pays special attention to the major adaptations required for life on land.

Lecture times: Monday - Friday, 3rd period

DP requirements: 40% for class record; submission of assignments on schedule and attendance at a 4 day field camp held during the September vacation..

Assessment: A 2-hour theory examination and 2-hour practical examination will each count 25% of the course, both written in November. There is a sub-minimum of 40% for the combined mark (theory & practical). Coursework marks will be allocated as follows: Practical classes (assessed weekly) count 15%; project based on field camp data counts 15%; two class tests count 20%.

 

BIO2012S   Life on Land: Plants

24 NQF credits at HEQSF level 6

Convener: Dr S B M Chimphango

Course entry requirements: BIO1000F or BIO1000H, BIO1004F/S

Course outline:

Terrestrial plants inhabit a broad range of environments, that are distinguished by their abiotic (e.g. light, temperature, water, nutrients) and biotic (e.g. animals, plants, microbes) features. Adaptation to contrasting habitats has generated a diversity of form in plants, as well as a fascinating array of ecophysiological and ecological strategies. Starting with roots, stems and leaves, and finishing with reproductive structures (flowers and seeds) and life-histories, this course explores plant structure and function, and the manner in which this has changed through the course of evolutionary history. This is followed by an introduction to the diversity of vascular plants, with an emphasis on flowering plants, particularly those that typify the Cape flora. Finally, the biology of bryophytes (mosses and relatives) is considered, highlighting the very different solutions they employ for a life on land.

Lecture times: Monday - Friday, 2nd period

DP requirements: Minimum of 40% for class record and attendance at practicals and five-day field camp.

Assessment: A 3-hour examination written in November, with a subminimum of 40%, will count 50% of the course. Coursework marks will be allocated as follows: Practical classes (assessed weekly) count 20%, project based on field camp data collection counts 10%; two class tests count 20%.

 

BIO2013F   Life in the Sea

24 NQF credits at HEQSF level 6

Convener: Dr D Pillay

Course entry requirements: BIO1000F or BIO1000H, BIO1004F/S.

Course outline:

The Life in the Sea course is intended to introduce students to the diversity of life present in oceans, including the invertebrates, vertebrates and plants. It will focus on adaptations of form to function (locomotion, reproduction, feeding) and to habitat (rocky shore, open ocean, sedimentary). The course is also intended to familiarise students with biophysical processes that influence life in the oceans.

Lecture times: Monday - Friday, 3rd period

DP requirements: 50% for class record; submission of assignments on schedule; attendance at field camp.

Assessment: A 3-hour examination, written in June, with a subminimum of 40% will count for 50% of the course. Coursework marks will be allocated as follows: Practical classes (assessed weekly) count 20%; project counts 10%; two class tests count 20%.