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Birds of a feather: different colours, same territory
A new paper co-authored by a Department of Biological Sciences trio has shed new light on an old conundrum: why some species occur in different colours and how this variation may provide a selective advantage in novel environments.
UCT ecologists harness the power of Google Images for research
A group of UCT researchers has found that animals caught on camera by amateur photographers and posted on the web are a useful tool for studying evolution and other ecological questions. Their study – the first of its kind – was published in Methods...
Bolus 150 anniversary
Bolus Herbarium celebrates its 150th anniversary
Academics, field botanists and plant enthusiasts celebrated the 150th anniversary of the oldest functioning herbarium in South Africa.
The plant that disguises itself as dung:
Shrub fools beetles into burying its seeds by making them look and smell like animal droppings
FRESHWATER LIFE
- A field guide to the plants and animals of southern Africa by CHARLES GRIFFITHS, JENNY DAY & MIKE PICKER

News

Monday, 20 February 2017
Dr Adam West

A teacher’s job is to help students realise that the creation of scientific knowledge is on-going and dynamic, and that they have a role to play in that, says Distinguished Teacher Awardee Dr Adam West of the Department of Biological Sciences.

 

Publication Date:
Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 15:00
Ceratocaryum argenteum

Jeremy Midgley, Gary Bronner and Joseph White from Biological Sciences at UCT and Steve Johnson from UKZN have reported in Nature Plants that the restio Ceratocaryum argenteum has its seeds buried by the dung beetle Epirinus flagellatus. The seeds look and smell like dung and this deceives the beetle into burying the seed, . . .

Publication Date:
Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 08:15

Departmental Seminar

Parvez Alam, from Åbo Akademi University (Finland) was visiting our department last week and gave a fantastic seminar:

 

 Seminar Abstract:
This lecture concerns size-scaling phenomena in biomimetics and provides insights into why biomimetics "may be" limited to application within specific length scales. The lecture aims to bring to light realistic challenges involved in developing design principles from nature. The lecture elucidates a number of superior design and production principles in nature that to this day, continue to confound biomimeticists the world over.

If you were not able to join us, you will be able to find the seminar on this [ link ]:

Publication Date:
Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 14:30
Welly Qwabe went on to join the University of Cape Town’s Marine Research Institute in 2011 to pursue a Masters in Zoology, with support from the Canon Collins Trust, the National Research Foundation and the Carnegie and Andrew Mellon Foundation.
Publication Date:
Friday, February 6, 2015 - 15:15

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